Wine Cuentista Newsletter – Edition 26 – February 2018

February: After a long, cool winter this is the last month of dormancy for the vines; sap is just starting to stir and circulate in the plant and vine growers across Spain will be finishing their winter pruning and selecting the buds they wish to produce fruit for 2017. The soil should be freshly ploughed, allowing aeration and deeper penetration for rainfall. Growers will be adding fertilisers and organic matter that will gradually break down, adding nutrients for the plants rapid growth in Spring. This is also the last time of the year to finish repairs on trellising systems and to make any major changes for the coming growing season; once it starts, it goes very quickly indeed!

Hello Wine Lovers! 2018 is well underway and last month we celebrated with two fully booked tastings, including an international blind tasting and an exploration of the wines of Portugal. This month we’ll be kicking off with another blind tasting, again with wines from all over the world. Then on the 22nd we’ll be looking at arguably the most well known red grape variety, Cabernet Sauvignon, and comparing examples from wine regions across the world. I don’t know which I’m looking forward to more as I adore blind tasting, but it’s always a great experience to taste a variety or style and track it around the world. Whichever you want to come to, do get in touch sooner rather than later as spots disappear quickly!

Events: Maestrazgo Wine Club:
8th February – ‘International Wine Tasting: Blind Tasting’ – 10 spots available – 30 euros/person
22nd February – ‘Cabernet Sauvignon Around the World – 10 spots available – 30 euros/person

Articles: I probably spend too much of my time reading online articles about wine. However, as a result I can find and select a choice few to share – here are my three favourites from last month!

1. ‘Negociants multiply in Burgundy’. With very little Burgundy being sold in Barcelona, and certainly not much en primeur, this may seem a little irrelevant to us. Yet it’s worth looking at the changing business models of the region, if only to see what happens when wines, and the land that makes them, becomes outrageously expensive. Most of the Burgundy I drink tends to be negociant wine, purely due to pricing and availability, yet there are some terrific examples out there. Jancis has a look at the subtly different approaches negociants take when setting up their business models, and the reasons behind them: https://www.jancisrobinson.com/articles/negociants-multiply-in-burgundy

2. ‘How to train a wine judge’ by Jeni Port. I had my first experience judging wine competitions in November last year, and greatly enjoyed the experience. Having learnt to taste with the WSET was a huge advantage as it already focuses on objectively analysing wine, often under blind conditions, and coming to a conclusion of quality/variety/region/price/ageability with supporting arguments absolutely necessary. Australia is the country that celebrates wine competitions more than any other, with a famous ‘circuit’ that constantly tastes and analyses wines under competition conditions. I would love to be part of this one day but for now, I’ll make do with this short write-up by Jeni Port, concisely explaining how the system works and some tips on how to taste under these conditions. https://www.meininger.de/en/wine-business-international/how-train-wine-judge

3. ‘The lure (and economics) of en primeur’ by Richard Hemming MW. I’ve always been fascinated by the idea of buying wine en primeur, yet I’ve not had the spare cash nor the storage space to consider it. The finances of it are increasingly less desirable yet the emotional tug is there. You’ve been to the tastings, met the wine-makers, taken studious notes and decided on your favourite wines. You’re buying the wines at a lower price, paying for storage and then VAT when they’re released to you. They arrive a year or two later, and you cast your mind back to the day you purchased them, check your notes and crack open a bottle. https://www.richardhemmingmw.com/blog/the-lure-and-economics-of-en-primeur

Wine of the Month: I’m constantly on the look-out for wines of real quality and value; here is my favourite wine of the month:

Catena Alta Malbec 2014: Catena Zapata remains an important winery for me, both as a reminder of some of the first quality wine I ever drank, one of the best winery visits of my life, as well as just being a constant provider of excellent wine for the last few years! Their 2009 Catena Alta Malbec blew me away, long before I become interested in wine, and this is the best vintage I’ve tried since then.100% Malbec from 4 high-altitude vineyards and aged in French oak for 18 months, 14.5% ABV. A lovely deep ruby colour and full of smokey dark fruits, oak spice, dark chocolate and sappy, herbal notes. The texture of this wine is its greatest feature, however; dense, supple and remarkably fresh – a Malbec worth ageing for a few years! One of the better Malbec wines on the market and another hit from the excellent Catena Zapata. For a full review of the wine and winery, check out my write-up here.

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These newsletters only come out once a month and there is a limit on space for content. If you use Social Media and want to keep up with regular wine updates and occasional rambles, feel free to connect with me on any of the following platforms.

Facebook: Wine Cuentista
Twitter: @Wine_Cuentista
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That’s it for this months newsletter. I hope you enjoyed it and please, if you have any suggestions or things you would like to see get in touch! Either respond to me here or email to fintankerr@winecuentista.com I can’t wait to see you all soon for more wine, food and good company. Happy New Year, everyone!

Fintan Kerr

Wine Cuentista Newsletter – Edition 24 – December 2017

Wine Cuentista Newsletter – Edition 24 – December 2017

December: The harvest is well and truly over! The grapes have been picked and the main focus will now be in the winery itself, as wines finish fermentation at different periods, destined for different styles of storage and ageing before being included in any final blends. In the vineyard, this is an excellent opportunity to prepare for the next year, with some growers choosing to clean up any unwanted weeds that have been growing throughout the harvest, wash the hard wood of the vines with a copper-based fungicide and cultivate the soil to allow the winter rains to soak in deeply. In cooler climates, a lot of growers now start ‘buttage’, that is the ploughing of soil close to the base of the vines to protect them against the cold winter weather. General maintenance work may start, but nearly all efforts will be focused towards the newly fermented wine and perhaps even an opportunity to take a break every now and again; certainly deserved after the strenuous efforts of the harvest!

Hello Wine Lovers! Here we are, in that most festive time of the year and gearing up for what is hopefully a stress-free and wonderful holiday for everyone. I’ll be working and studying all through the month, but we’ve still got enough time for at least one more tasting before we say goodbye to 2017 completely. As it’s the last tasting of the year, it feels like a good opportunity to revisit ‘Fintan’s Fridge’ and pull out some special bottles. I suspect spots will disappear quite quickly so for anyone I don’t see over the coming month, happy holidays and I look forward to catching up over a glass in the new year!

Events: Maestrazgo Wine Club:

14th December – Fintan’s Fridge– 40 euros p/p


Articles: I probably spend too much of my time reading online articles about wine. However, as a result I can find and select a choice few to share – here are my three favourites from last month!

1. ‘Where Burgundy meets New Zealand’ by Elaine Chukan Brown. The term ‘Burgundian’ is thrown around a lot in the wine world, far too often in my own opinion, and is a constant reminder of just how well thought of Burgundy is in the industry. However, I was delighted to discover that a region as Pinot-obsessed as Burgundy actually had a strong connection, even more so when I discovered it was one of my favourite wine regions in the world; Central Otago. Burgundy isn’t a place renowned for opening its doors and sharing its knowledge, so this came as a truly pleasant surprise and I suspect both regions will gain a lot from the association! https://www.jancisrobinson.com/articles/where-burgundy-meets-new-zealand

2. ‘WWC’ 5 by Pierazzo da Faltre. As there’s not been a huge amount of stand-out wine-writing this November, a throw-back to one of my favourite articles from 2016! One of the most charming pieces of writing I’ve read for a long time. A wine-writing competition was launched by Jancis Robinson MW and some of the resulting pieces are now being published on her website, including this gem. A rambling, delicate piece about the simplicity of wine, local food and wine culture in an almost Hemingway-esque style. If you read anything, read this. http://www.jancisrobinson.com/articles/wwc-5-pierazzo-da-feltre

Wine of the Month: I’m constantly on the look-out for wines of real quality and value; here is my favourite wine of the month:

Algueira Pizarra 2014: Every month I find this decision becoming harder and harder; a sure sign that I’m spoilt when it comes to the amount of excellent wine that I get to try! Beating out a superb Syrah from A.Clape and some top contenders from the rest of Spain comes this pure, wonderful Mencia from one of Ribeira Sacra’s top producers; Algueira.

Adega Algueira is a top quality estate ran by Fernando and Ana, two of the grass-root growers who’ve since decided to go it alone and with spectacular results. A mere 11ha of land makes up their estate, focusing primarily on Mencia and Godello, with small bottlings of Merenzao, Caino and Souson to boot. Their ‘Pizarra’ bottling is their flagship wine, coming from the Carballocovo vineyard with vines over 80 years old. Whole bunch fermentation, vinified in large oak and then aged in 600l barrels for 11-14 months, this is serious stuff.

It’s also right up there with the best wines from Ribeira Sacra. A medium ruby colour and wow, what a nose! Bright, red cherries, violets, wild herbs, black pepper and smoked meat – this is a beautiful middle-ground between Burgundy and the Northern Rhone. Fresh and bright on the palate with real tension to the wine and a long finish; superb. Already complex and will drink beautifully over the next 5 years. Ribeira Sacra really is going from strength to strength!

Social Media
These newsletters only come out once a month and there is a limit on space for content. If you use Social Media and want to keep up with regular wine updates and occasional rambles, feel free to connect with me on any of the following platforms.

Facebook: Wine Cuentista
Twitter: @Wine_Cuentista
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That’s it for this months newsletter. I hope you enjoyed it and please, if you have any suggestions or things you would like to see get in touch! Either respond to me here or email to fintankerr@winecuentista.com I can’t wait to see you all soon for more wine, food and good company.

Fintan Kerr

Wine Cuentista Newsletter – Edition 23 – November 2017

Maestrazgo Wine Club Newsletter – Edition 23 – November 2017

November: This is typically the last month of the harvest for most wine-makers and indeed, practically all the white grapes and most of the reds will have been picked, pressed and begun fermentation already, with the exception of some late-ripening varieties or those small pockets of grapes in particular micro-climates. The big task in November is making the wine; with winery space at a premium and stainless steel tanks, barrels and concrete eggs all full of fermenting wine that has to be monitored constantly in order to make sure the temperatures, nutrient levels and volatile components are all in check. It can be a pretty stressful place to be! Now the time in the vineyard is more or less over, biology takes a back-seat to chemistry as science and artistry vie for control of the process. If the harvest was good and a good crop of healthy grapes was brought in, the sky is the limit for a skilled wine-maker. If the yield was low and/or poor quality due to rots, fungi, weather conditions or unforeseen circumstances then the wine-maker will have a challenge on their hands to turn it into a good quality wine that can return the investment of the year.

Hello Wine Lovers! It’s been a long month for everyone in Barcelona, politically and socially, and I’m glad that Autumn seems to be finally rolling in with cooler weather and, hopefully, cooler heads! From a wine perspective it’s perfect drinking weather, with red wines drinking beautifully at room temperature and bigger white wines starting to appear on dinner tables around the country, perfect for the bolder fare of the colder months. Due to a convoluted schedule and a brilliant opportunity to start learning how to judge at wine competitions with the IWC, I’m afraid we can only present a single tasting this month. However, it’s a great one and a good opportunity to look at some high quality, contemporary wines from a country we haven’t looked at in a while… Spain! Entitled “The New Spain’ in tribute to the late John Radford, a Spanish wine expert who last wrote the complete book about Spanish wine under the same name, it’s not to be missed! As always, to contact me and book a spot, get in touch here.

Events: Maestrazgo Wine Club:

23rd November – The New Spain – 30 euros p/p

Articles: I probably spend too much of my time reading online articles about wine. However, as a result I can find and select a choice few to share – here are my three favourites from last month!

  1. ‘Whatever…it’s rosé’ by The Sediment Blog. Getting excited about rosé as a wine professional can be tricky as it’s so often a wishy-washy wine. Exciting on the nose and then utterly disappointing on the palate. Or a deeper, structured wine that makes you wonder… why didn’t I just get a glass of red instead? Whilst top quality rosé wines certainly do exist, I still enjoyed this little bit from the hilarious CJ and PK over at the Sediment Blog. http://sedimentblog.blogspot.com.es/2017/10/whateverits-rose.html

  1. ’10 Smart Rioja Buys’ by Amaya Cervera. One reason I’m excited about getting the WSET Diploma out of the way in January is that I can start focusing a lot more on Spanish wines again. Here, Amaya Cervera of Spanish Wine Lover creates a list of 10 different wines from DOC Rioja to sample. Split into three major parts and likely to start focusing on wines from individual villages and vineyards, Rioja is an exciting place to be at the moment. For all the attention lauded (rightly so) on the new wave wines from Galicia, there are quite a few wines in this list I wouldn’t mind getting hold of! https://www.spanishwinelover.com/enjoy-277-ten-smart-buys-that-reflect-riojas-amazing-diversity

  1. ‘Lady-strangler News’ by Miquel Hudin. No, really. That’s the title. Miquel looks at a provocatively entitled grape variety native to DOQ Priorat and an exciting new discovery. The wine referenced is also one of the most delicious white wines from Priorat and should anyone be visiting, I heartily recommend a visit to Marc Ripoll Sans, as his 100% Carignan is also superb. https://wineonsix.com/lady-strangler-news-escanyavella-2015/

Wine of the Month: I’m constantly on the look-out for wines of real quality and value; you’ll find me mostly drinking in the 6-25 euro range.

Chave Seleccions ‘Offerus’ 2013 Every month this seems to get tougher and tougher, but this excellent St.Joseph stood out for its purity of fruit and sheer drinkability; a gem of a wine made from the least considered region in the Northern Rhone. The easterly facing vineyards get 1-2 hours less vital sunlight than their neighbours and as a result, most of the Syrah here struggles to ripen fully, particularly in cooler years. Louis J Chave, the iconic producer of Hermitage, recognises this and produces a crisp, pure wine with a gorgeous core of fruit and a clean herbal edge. Who says that negociant wines can’t be great? Certainly not the cheapest wine at 26 euros a bottle through https://www.vinissimus.com/es/vinos/tinto/detalle_vino.html?id_vino=offer13 but a genuinely delicious drink. It’d have to be to beat the competition this month!

Social Media
These newsletters only come out once a month and there is a limit on space for content. If you use Social Media and want to keep up with regular wine updates and occasional rambles, feel free to connect with me on any of the following platforms.

FacebookWine Cuentista
Twitter@Wine_Cuentista
Instagramwine_cuentista

That’s it for this months newsletter. I hope you enjoyed it and please, if you have any suggestions or things you would like to see get in touch! Either respond to me here or email to fintankerr@winecuentista.com I can’t wait to see you all soon for more wine, food and good company.

Fintan Kerr

Wine Cuentista Newsletter – Edition 22 – October 2017

October: The harvest is in full swing! Visit any major vineyard, especially those harvesting red grapes at this time of the year and you’ll find a very busy time for most vignerons and wine-makers. Harvesting the grapes is always a delicate negotiation with the weather; the fact that the 12th October would be ideal according to your plans isn’t always factored in by mother nature, who is quite prone to rain at this time of the year, promoting both fungal rot and dilution of the grapes, forcing workers to pick earlier than otherwise desired. The winery itself will be working hard everyday and, in big commercial operations, around the clock to clean, select, destem, press and start the fermentation process for the incoming grapes. Hired hands mix with experienced, full time staff, the fields are alive with the sounds of picking and all this time, whoever owns the operation is praying that this year will see enough healthy, ripe grapes to make a reasonable profit. One of the real beauties of wine is this reliance on the basic crop; the humble grape. With the right phenolic ripeness, balance of acidity and sugar and the attention of a skilled wine-maker, the sky is the limit. 2017 is already proving to be an early year for Spain, so most will be finishing up over the next two weeks.

Hello Wine Lovers! It’s so nice to be back again, organising tastings with you all. I very much enjoyed our tastings looking at some Summer Discoveries from both the Old and New Worlds, and it was a nice way to introduce some new, top quality wines. This month we’ll be organising two more tastings with stronger themes. First of all, we’ll be heading back to that perennial favourite favourite on the 12th Octber; blind tasting. 6 different wines from around the world to be tasted, analysed and then speculated upon. It’s a lot harder than it looks, but also a lot more fun as well! Then, on the 26th we’ll be taking a trip to the north of France to discover the Loire Valley, one of the largest yet least known regions in France. Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Cabernet Franc… all grown in these cool climate, resulting in wines with real character and charm. Make sure to check the tastings out here and contact me to reserve your spots!

Events: Maestrazgo Wine Club:

12th October– International Blind Tasting – 30 euros p/p

26th October – International Tasting: The Loire Valley – 30 euros p/p

Articles: I probably spend too much of my time reading online articles about wine. However, as a result I can find and select a choice few to share – here are my three favourites from last month!

1. ‘France’s Shrunken 2017 Vintage’ by Gavin Quinney. Gavin Quinney owns a wine estate in Bordeaux and produces vintage reports for Jancisrobinson.com on an annual basis. 2017 has been one of the worst harvests in living memory, with huge swathes of delicate buds and flowers annihilated by Spring frosts. Whilst this, along with a plummeting pound, is bad news for the UK wine market, it isn’t the reason I’m sharing this article. At the bottom, Gavin sums up 10 ways to interpret the data and I think it’s a great way to look at isolated parts of the wine industry, as part of a bigger picture. https://www.jancisrobinson.com/articles/frances-shrunken-2017-vintage-10-considerations

2. ‘Rioja could be a victim of it’s own success’ by Yolanda Ortiz de Arri. A slightly misleading article title, as the piece is really an interview with an incredibly interesting sommelier in Rioja, covering various topics. I really gain a lot of interesting, contextual information from reading interviews and listening to podcasts, and this is no different. Carlos Echapresto and his brother run a small restaurant in Rioja, mainly focusing on local wines and centred around their philosophy of being genuine hosts. A statement that really stood out for me regarding the sale of expensive wines: “I won’t sell it to a Russian billionaire who wants it as a whim because I don’t want to make money with them. The public might think they are worth a certain amount, but it’s not my case. I store these beauties to treat friends..” My kind of guy! https://www.spanishwinelover.com/enjoy-272-sommelier-carlos-echapresto-rioja-could-be-a-victim-of-its-own-success

3. ‘Take it away…’ by Paul Keers. I don’t often link articles from the Sediment Blog, mainly because the humour is very British and I’m not sure that everyone will find it as hilarious as I do. However, I had to share this one. Paul, known as PK in the blog, lampoons a lacklustre Sangiovese and mostly before he’s even tried it! Wine marketing isn’t always a success, especially when it falls into the hands of a cynically hilarious wine-lover! http://sedimentblog.blogspot.com.es/2017/09/take-it-away.html

Wine of the month: I’m constantly on the look-out for wines of real quality and value; you’ll find me mostly drinking in the 6-25 euro range.

Ritual Pinot Noir 2015: Choosing this wine seems to get harder and harder every month, which is probably a sure sign that I’m drinking too much! Regardless, the winner this month, and reconfirmed by its success at our New World wine tasting this week, is Ritual Pinot Noir 2015 from the Casablanca Valley in Chile. The fact they’re able to produce such a charming, accessible Pinot Noir at 15 euros a bottle is remarkable and good news for wine lovers everywhere! A fruit-forward wine with lots of bright cherries, strawberries and hints of pepper and toast from the 20% new oak, with some whole-bunch freshness and a touch of something earthy. Very ‘New World’ and extremely likeable. I purchased this wine through Vinissimus.com who are doing a really good job of supplying a strong selection of wines, through different styles and price points.

Social Media
These newsletters only come out once a month and there is a limit on space for content. If you use Social Media and want to keep up with regular wine updates and occasional rambles, feel free to connect with me on any of the following platforms.

FacebookWine Cuentista
Twitter@Wine_Cuentista
Instagramwine_cuentista

That’s it for this months newsletter. I hope you enjoyed it and please, if you have any suggestions or things you would like to see get in touch! Either respond to me here or email to fintankerr@winecuentista.com I can’t wait to see you all soon for more wine, food and good company. ?

Fintan Kerr

Wine Cuentista Newsletter – Edition 21 – September 2017

September: So it begins – the harvest is upon us! Spain is a vast, diverse country with regards to wine production and so unsurprisingly, there are various different stages of harvest. By this point, Cava grapes are already mid-way through harvesting as they tend to be picked slightly earlier to retain the high acidity that is prized for ageing potential in older wines and freshness in younger wines. A lot of white wines aiming to retain bright fruit flavours and high acidity will also be being picked, particularly in hot regions where the grapes can easily over-ripen and produce wines with unbalanced flavours and even some light reds, particularly Tempranillo may well undergo harvest this month. Vignerons and wine-makers alike will keep a wary eye on the sky, as excess rain during harvest can induce rots, fungi and often dilute the flavours they have worked so hard to nurture. Quality-minded producers will be spending a lot of money to hire trained pickers to gently harvest the grapes before transporting them in small, 15kg boxes to avoid crushing the grapes and losing precious flavours and aromas to oxidation. An entire years worth of effort comes down to these next few crucial months, as the saying goes: ‘It’s possible to make very bad wine with good grapes, but it’s impossible to make great wine with bad grapes!”

Hello Wine Lovers and welcome back! September is finally here and after a long, hot summer, I’m about ready to get back to wine tasting. With it being the first tastings of Maestrazgo Wine Club, I’m excited to be kicking off with some ‘discovery’ tastings – aka, showcasing some delicious new wines I’ve tasted over the last few months. We’ll have a tasting for the Old World wines and a separate one for the New World but remember that these are now available first through Wine Cuentista, so check them out here and reserve your spot. Aside from that, it’s time for an intense few months of studying ahead of my final exam for the WSET Diploma, ahead of a beautifully exam-less 2018. I hope you’ve all enjoyed the summer and hopefully I’ll see a few of you for a tasting soon!

Events: Maestrazgo Wine Club:

14th September – Summer Discoveries: Old World – 10 spots available
28th September – Summer Discoveries: New World – 10 spots available

Articles: I probably spend too much of my time reading online articles about wine. However, as a result I can find and select a choice few to share – here are my three favourites from last month!

1. ‘Italian Wine – 3000 years older than we thought’ by Chris Mercer. One of the bigger discoveries in the wine world recently was a series of caves in Sicily containing, what is believed to be, wine-making equipment. Given that this dates back to 4,000BC, it’s a big change in the common belief that the ancient Greeks brought wine-making to Italy and opens the door to a whole new range of possibilities. As a history geek, I’m very curious to see the final report on these findings and who knows what may be uncovered as a result? http://www.decanter.com/wine-news/oldest-italian-wine-study-375334-375334/

2. ‘How to make money in the wine business’ – by Felicity Carter. A large part of the reason I’ve chosen to study with the WSET over CMS (Court of Master Sommeliers) is that the industry of wine interests me far more than the correct, formal service of it. As a result, I love anything that gets to grips with the realities of the industry as if there’s one thing we’re not short on, it’s romantic wine-related stories and quasi-science. Whilst not exactly ground-breaking stuff, Felicity Carter makes an important point about the financial realities of producing wine and how some in the industry get carried away with the fantasy of it all. Here’s hoping for some more of the same transparency on other financial/business related issues within the industry! https://www.meininger.de/en/wine-business-international/how-make-money-wine-business

3. ‘Changes afoot in Rioja’ by Yolanda Ortiz de Arri. I’ve linked a few articles related to the recent turmoil in Rioja, we’ve spoken about it in tastings and I’m actually digging into it a little more deeply for an article myself, but Yolanda does a good job, as always, of summarising the more important points as well as getting some local reaction. Reaction to what, exactly? Well, the tiny step forward that Rioja has taken as a region, allowing for both regional and village names to be appended to Rioja labels meaning greater specificity for consumers and the start of our understanding of Rioja terroir. Sounds great doesn’t it? Naturally, there’s a catch… http://www.spanishwinelover.com/learn-265-village-wines-in-rioja-will-be-based-on-the-location-of-the-winery

Wine of the month: I’m constantly on the look-out for wines of real quality and value; I rarely purchase anything over 30-40 euros a bottle and more commonly you’ll find me drinking in the 6-25 euro range.

Bohorquez Reserva 2007

I tried this for the first time only a few days ago and I have to take my hat off to this small but dedicated team of vignerons – the wine is absolutely delicious. Ribera del Duero has become a tricky region for me, with many of the wines simply trying for too much and missing the target as a result, but this hit the spot nicely. Bohorquez was only founded in 1999 but stylistically, it’s leaning towards the Pesquera/Vega Sicilia way of making wine, which is to say a longer maceration and ageing process, restrained alcohol levels (14%) and considerably less of the overt, ripe fruit flavours so typical of the region.

Yet there is a good concentration of slightly dried red and black fruits here, cedar, coffee, dill, leather, tobacco and earth. This wine is in a really good place, with a lovely spectrum of flavours and a wonderfully elegant texture. Restrained and classic, with that smoky, leathery finish I so enjoy!

Social Media
These newsletters only come out once a month and there is a limit on space for content. If you use Social Media and want to keep up with regular wine updates and occasional rambles, feel free to connect with me on any of the following platforms.

Facebook: Wine Cuentista
Twitter: @Wine_Cuentista
Instagram: wine_cuentista

That’s it for this months newsletter. I hope you enjoyed it and please, if you have any suggestions or things you would like to see get in touch! Either respond to me here or email to fintankerr@winecuentista.com I can’t wait to see you all soon for more wine, food and good company. 🙂

Fintan Kerr

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